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STRUGGLE IN THE PERSIAN GULF   277
The lesser Flemming never a shrowde standing, never
a topmast."
Thus ended the fight, in which the losses on the
English side were small in number but included the
gallant Captain Shilling. Each time I land at Jask I
wonder whether a monument will ever be erected to
celebrate this victory, which would recall the prowess of
our ancestors and serve as an inspiration to their descend-
ants. The merchants, after this decisive action, returned
to business, took in five hundred and twenty bales of
silk, and went back to Surat.
The Capture ofHormuz by an Anglo-Persian Expedition,
A.D. 1622.—At the end of 1621 the English squadron of
five ships and four pinnaces upon reaching Jask received
orders to proceed to Kuhistak, a port some forty miles
south of Minab. There the two captains in command
found the factors and were informed that the position of
affairs was critical.
Hostilities had recently broken out between the
Persians and the Portuguese, and the latter had been
sacking the ports, which the former were totally unable
to defend. On the other hand, a Persian army had
established itself in Kishm and was besieging the Portu-
guese fort; but it was out of the question for the
Persians to attack Hormuz unless the English could be
induced to co-operate. Imam Kuli Khan, son of Allah
Verdi Khan, who conducted the operations as Governor
of Fars, showed a good deal of political acumen. He
held out promises of reward, combined with a hint that,
should the factors refuse to co-operate in a war which had
been mainly provoked on account of the privileges granted
to the English, these privileges would be cancelled, and
the silk that was in transit would be confiscated.
The question was debated at considerable length.
There was peace in Europe between the Courts of
England and Portugal, represented by Spain, although
in Eastern waters the two powers had always fought one
another. The Directors of the Company, who would have
to bear the brunt if King James should think it advisable
to make a scapegoat, would almost certainly disapprove